ReFS issues with latest Windows Server Updates (KB5009624, KB5009557, KB5009555)



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@TKA Just like @JMeixner I've only had good experiences with ReFS. The only time it failed was because if controller/SFP problems. Perhaps in your case the volume was ok and only turned RAW because of the updates mentioned in this topic.

@dloseke Are those virtual disks or physical volumes?

Userlevel 7
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@dlosekeAre those virtual disks or physical volumes?

 

Excellent question!  In both cases, these are RDM disks and the underlying storage is an ISCSI volume presented to the ESXI hosts from a Synology NAS.

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From Windows Server 2016 it is recommended to use REFS. Normally there are no issues with it. Before W2016, yes indeed. The advantages with using REFS compared to NTFS are big : you can use synthetic full backups so allows you to have much more restore points on the same size of storage and is much more faster because pointers are being used to blocks being identical that are already located on the storage. I would never go backup to NTFS except when using rotating USB disks, then I recommended to use NTFS over REFS because using GFS is  not possible with the rotated option.

Userlevel 7
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@dlosekeAre those virtual disks or physical volumes?

 

Excellent question!  In both cases, these are RDM disks and the underlying storage is an ISCSI volume presented to the ESXI hosts from a Synology NAS.

Try to use always iSCSI volumes inside the Windows VM and not to the ESXi host and use then RDM disks. It functions better in my experience and less dependent of things like VMware.

Userlevel 7
Badge +6

 

@dlosekeAre those virtual disks or physical volumes?

 

Excellent question!  In both cases, these are RDM disks and the underlying storage is an ISCSI volume presented to the ESXI hosts from a Synology NAS.

Try to use always iSCSI volumes inside the Windows VM and not to the ESXi host and use then RDM disks. It functions better in my experience and less dependent of things like VMware.

 

I suppose that’s true.  I’ve been using RDM’s because I have better multipathing capabilities, but I suppose that could be worked out with multiple NIC’s on the VM tied to certain port groups that are dedicated to certain physical NIC’s maybe?  I guess I haven’t given it much consideration.  I will say that I hate the ISCSI initiator in Windows and the MPIO driver, but that’s just personal preference...the VMware ISCSI is easier to setup IMO.  But that doesn’t make it better either….

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You guys scared me bringing back this post. I just saw the title haha

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