Question

Accommodating a mass amount of workstations in VBR


Userlevel 7
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If someone has been doing image based backups of 100+ workstations in Acronis, but is interested in moving to a VBR environment, how do we accommodate that scale of workstation backups? The only thing I know to do is throw the Windows agent on them and create an agent backup within VBR, but I am curious if there is a better solution.


9 comments

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

Userlevel 7
Badge +20

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

This is a good option for domain joined machines and it scales well. Your protection group will be based on an AD security group and you add the computer objects into this. You could even do multiple security groups based on location if you’ve got multiple offices, so you can target local repositories to prevent excessive WAN/MPLS bandwidth.

 

Also, what will your target be, a local repository or using some of the new v12 direct to object goodness?

Userlevel 7
Badge +3

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

Do you know if there’s a KB available for this procedure?

Userlevel 7
Badge +3

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

This is a good option for domain joined machines and it scales well. Your protection group will be based on an AD security group and you add the computer objects into this. You could even do multiple security groups based on location if you’ve got multiple offices, so you can target local repositories to prevent excessive WAN/MPLS bandwidth.

 

Also, what will your target be, a local repository or using some of the new v12 direct to object goodness?

Unknown at the moment. I am still getting details. I just now found out their space requirements and the “100+ workstation image backups in Acronis” news got dropped on me at the same time.

Userlevel 7
Badge +21

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

Do you know if there’s a KB available for this procedure?

No KB but check the Help documentation.  I am sure it has steps and best practices.

Userlevel 7
Badge +3

If you wanted to save time you can use VBR and set up an AD group, then add that to the console to then push the agent out.  Rather than installing it on each and every server.  Then you can create jobs based on the group in VBR.  To me that would be the easiest way.

Do you know if there’s a KB available for this procedure?

No KB but check the Help documentation.  I am sure it has steps and best practices.

I’ll look further into it. I had no idea this was even an option in Veeam. Thanks so much for chiming in on this @Chris.Childerhose @MicoolPaul 

Userlevel 7
Badge +20

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/agents/protection_group_ad.html?ver=120
 

here’s the link, I use AD sec groups primarily due to the opt in/out nature of adding to a sec group without changing your AD structure, but specifying an OU for example might be suitable based on your requirements.

 

Something to consider, if you’re not backing up locally, you’ll want to consider the bandwidth constraints that a protection group would have of hitting the same target at the same time. If the devices are permanently on premises then you could use a gateway server to enforce bandwidth throttling if necessary. But where available and/or network location is fluid, using QoS to manage the bandwidth is best.

Userlevel 7
Badge +3

https://helpcenter.veeam.com/docs/backup/agents/protection_group_ad.html?ver=120
 

here’s the link, I use AD sec groups primarily due to the opt in/out nature of adding to a sec group without changing your AD structure, but specifying an OU for example might be suitable based on your requirements.

 

Something to consider, if you’re not backing up locally, you’ll want to consider the bandwidth constraints that a protection group would have of hitting the same target at the same time. If the devices are permanently on premises then you could use a gateway server to enforce bandwidth throttling if necessary. But where available and/or network location is fluid, using QoS to manage the bandwidth is best.

Thank you!

Userlevel 7
Badge +8

My biggest concern would be the storage of 100 PC’s.

 

I back up a few hundred VM’s and Veeam scales just fine. 

 

Check out the best practices for Repos and proxies as once you get into a ton of concurrent tasks these things come into play. 

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